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How do men feel about seeing a urologist who is female?

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uroh
User offline. Last seen 29 weeks 18 hours ago. Offline
Joined: 2011-12-17

I would venture to say that the majority of women prefer female gynecologists. How do men feel in a similar situation? Do any women urologists out here have any thoughts on this?

Nothing fancy, just curious about opinions, speculative or not.

Anonymous User
Non issue

While I am a male and have no direct insight (at least on the physician side) into this, I can tell you that many (but not enough. . .) urologists are female. I have heard of only very rare issues where gender has come up as an issue with patients. I finished residence several years ago and have been around numerous female urologists -- all were (are) very talented and happy individuals and their gender was never something that hindered their ability to take care of men and their various GU issues.

Anonymous User
As a male I wound't care. In

As a male I wound't care. In fact, i probably rather have a female doctor than a male one...

Anonymous User
I would agree with the

I would agree with the previous Anonymous writer.  I am a woman and a senior urology resident.  This issue was a concern to me when I was a medical student trying to decide if urology was a viable career for me.  I almost always get a look of surprise from men when I walk into the exam room, and some patients (outspoken VA vets, for the most part) actually voice their surprise that I'm their urologist.  But they realize quickly that I know what I'm talking about when I address their GU issues, and any gender concerns quickly become a non-issue.  In the last several years of residency, there has been perhaps 2 episodes when a man has requested a different doctor because of my gender.  These men tend to be young and were all being seen in the infertility/sexual dysfunction clinic.  You can imagine that young men with sexual dysfunction probably have a complex array of psycho-emotional issues wrapped up in their pathology, so seeing a female provider is probably not the best idea.  For the record, there have been many, many more episodes when I have been called to see a female patient who has refused one of my male colleagues (typically in religiously-oriented immigrant populations).

I do wonder, however, if outside of residency, male patients will vote with their feet and go only to providers who are male.  My impression is that female urologists in the community see a heavily female patient population... which keeps them busy enough as is.

Anonymous User
Serious Issue

Anonymous User wrote:

I do wonder, however, if outside of residency, male patients will vote with their feet and go only to providers who are male.  My impression is that female urologists in the community see a heavily female patient population... which keeps them busy enough as is.

 

I think this is a serious issue that medical providers refuse to address because they don't want to hear the answer. Medical care is administered in a claimed gender-neutral environment for expediency and profit and yet society is not gender neutral. To claim otherwise is disingenuous at best.  Moreover, female patients are routinely afforded a much greater degree of modesty, dignity, and privacy than male patients. 

Receiving medical care of an extremely personal nature by the opposite gender depends on the context (at least for me). ER or major surgery is distinctly different than an outpatient appointment with your urologist. For me personally, the gender of my doctor when I need to be undressed or talk about very personal health problems is important. When choosing a physician, the only things I’m certain about is board certification and gender, everything else is a roll of the dice. When agreeing to a particular exam or procedure, I’ve at least established a professional relationship and comfortable enough with that physician to agree with his (or her) recommendation. My issue with a urological exam/procedure and the physician requiring assistance, is the female nurse/assistant, who’ve I’ve never met, arriving in the exam room unannounced, with little if any introduction, and no explanation of why their presence is required. Additionally, I’ve no idea what their professional qualifications are. Many times they are not nurses’ at all but simply assistants. Personally, a female high school graduate, with months of vocational training, has not earned the professional distinction to witness, much less participate, in any exam or procedure of a personal nature. However, if I’ve established a professional relationship with a female nurse, I may agree to her presence, if informed consent is obtained. Being seen undressed by male nurses or assistants isn’t much different than changing my clothes in the locker room at the gym. However, undressing for women (I’m not married to) is very uncomfortable.

Having been on the receiving end of just such an incident, I asked my Urologist the following questions: With the exception of yourself and another male physician, I see an all female team. Given the extremely personal nature of the care you provide and the potential for embarrassment, where are your male staff members? Response: the only males are two of three physicians. You do understand many men, if asked, would decline opposite gender intimate care?  If you doubt that, just look at the male/female patient ratio between the three physicians of this practice; that’s no accident. Response: 70% of male patients are seen by the two male physicians and indicated he was aware of patient preferences. You would never expect a female patient to submit to an intimate examination or procedure with a male assistant without asking first, correct. Response: He agreed. If you require assistance to perform a particular exam or procedure, why don't you ask your male patient whether a female attending is acceptable? Why do you assume it's OK for a female to be present?  Response: He doesn’t have any male nurses or assistants and cannot afford to staff a practice with all male staff. I replied no one expects an all male staff; one would be better than none. Response: No comment. Your failure to ask is presumptuous, unethical, and unprofessional. Instead, you and your assistant effectively ambush patients expecting compliance. Nude, gowned or not, in need of medical care is a difficult time to make a stand. Where is the informed consent? Response: no comment. Needless to say, he is no longer my physician.  There is clearly only one standard of care for both genders; I am entitled to the same standards of modesty, dignity, and privacy that female patients are routinely afforded!

 

Match2011
User offline. Last seen 27 weeks 2 days ago. Offline
Joined: 2011-01-24
dude, chill

Anonymous User wrote:

Anonymous User wrote:

I do wonder, however, if outside of residency, male patients will vote with their feet and go only to providers who are male.  My impression is that female urologists in the community see a heavily female patient population... which keeps them busy enough as is.

 

I think this is a serious issue that medical providers refuse to address because they don't want to hear the answer. Medical care is administered in a claimed gender-neutral environment for expediency and profit and yet society is not gender neutral. To claim otherwise is disingenuous at best.  Moreover, female patients are routinely afforded a much greater degree of modesty, dignity, and privacy than male patients. 

Receiving medical care of an extremely personal nature by the opposite gender depends on the context (at least for me). ER or major surgery is distinctly different than an outpatient appointment with your urologist. For me personally, the gender of my doctor when I need to be undressed or talk about very personal health problems is important. When choosing a physician, the only things I’m certain about is board certification and gender, everything else is a roll of the dice. When agreeing to a particular exam or procedure, I’ve at least established a professional relationship and comfortable enough with that physician to agree with his (or her) recommendation. My issue with a urological exam/procedure and the physician requiring assistance, is the female nurse/assistant, who’ve I’ve never met, arriving in the exam room unannounced, with little if any introduction, and no explanation of why their presence is required. Additionally, I’ve no idea what their professional qualifications are. Many times they are not nurses’ at all but simply assistants. Personally, a female high school graduate, with months of vocational training, has not earned the professional distinction to witness, much less participate, in any exam or procedure of a personal nature. However, if I’ve established a professional relationship with a female nurse, I may agree to her presence, if informed consent is obtained. Being seen undressed by male nurses or assistants isn’t much different than changing my clothes in the locker room at the gym. However, undressing for women (I’m not married to) is very uncomfortable.

Having been on the receiving end of just such an incident, I asked my Urologist the following questions: With the exception of yourself and another male physician, I see an all female team. Given the extremely personal nature of the care you provide and the potential for embarrassment, where are your male staff members? Response: the only males are two of three physicians. You do understand many men, if asked, would decline opposite gender intimate care?  If you doubt that, just look at the male/female patient ratio between the three physicians of this practice; that’s no accident. Response: 70% of male patients are seen by the two male physicians and indicated he was aware of patient preferences. You would never expect a female patient to submit to an intimate examination or procedure with a male assistant without asking first, correct. Response: He agreed. If you require assistance to perform a particular exam or procedure, why don't you ask your male patient whether a female attending is acceptable? Why do you assume it's OK for a female to be present?  Response: He doesn’t have any male nurses or assistants and cannot afford to staff a practice with all male staff. I replied no one expects an all male staff; one would be better than none. Response: No comment. Your failure to ask is presumptuous, unethical, and unprofessional. Instead, you and your assistant effectively ambush patients expecting compliance. Nude, gowned or not, in need of medical care is a difficult time to make a stand. Where is the informed consent? Response: no comment. Needless to say, he is no longer my physician.  There is clearly only one standard of care for both genders; I am entitled to the same standards of modesty, dignity, and privacy that female patients are routinely afforded

 

First off, if you think female patients are accorded more modesty and privacy, you've clearly neven been there for a gyn exam, often with attending + resident + chaperone +/- med student, or in the L&D suite near delivery (i've counted 7-8 people for a routine delivery).  Hell you can't even do an EKG or good cardiac exam without moving breasts around.  That's not even getting into gyn procedures and the whole exam under anesthesia debate. For men, it's generally a quick turn your head and cough and a finger up the butt, much faster. I'll take that over a speculum any day. 

While I agree that it's preferable to take patient gender preference into account, that's not practical on a day to day basis. Even if the clinic you're talkiing about had the aforementioned male staff member, what makes you think he would be free at the exact moment you need him? It's already hard enough to schedule an appointment, imagine if you had to scheduel an appointment for a "male physician with male chaperone and female receptionist"all so you don't feel uncomfortable.  Furthermore, as a doctor you are a trained professional regardless of gender, which the patient must acknowledge. If gender is a more important factor to a patient then competence of rapport, then by all means they can visit another urologist. 

Anonymous User
Serious Issue

[/quote]

First off, if you think female patients are accorded more modesty and privacy, you've clearly neven been there for a gyn exam, often with attending + resident + chaperone +/- med student, or in the L&D suite near delivery (i've counted 7-8 people for a routine delivery).  Hell you can't even do an EKG or good cardiac exam without moving breasts around.  That's not even getting into gyn procedures and the whole exam under anesthesia debate. For men, it's generally a quick turn your head and cough and a finger up the butt, much faster. I'll take that over a speculum any day. 

While I agree that it's preferable to take patient gender preference into account, that's not practical on a day to day basis. Even if the clinic you're talkiing about had the aforementioned male staff member, what makes you think he would be free at the exact moment you need him? It's already hard enough to schedule an appointment, imagine if you had to scheduel an appointment for a "male physician with male chaperone and female receptionist"all so you don't feel uncomfortable.  Furthermore, as a doctor you are a trained professional regardless of gender, which the patient must acknowledge. If gender is a more important factor to a patient then competence of rapport, then by all means they can visit another urologist. 

[/quote]

 

While you're certainly entitled to your opinion, I respectfully disagree.  It is highly unlikely a female patient would ever be subjected to a routine OB/GYN exam or procedure in her physician's private practice with such an entourage and certainly not without her prior informed consent.  Moreover, it's even more unlikely the practice employs a single male ancillary staff member (nurse, tech, or chaperone) regardless of the physician's gender.

While I'm unsure how your chaperone comments relate to this discussion, if there actually are urologists performing exams or procedures on male patients with a chaperone attending, patients will likely vote with their feet post haste.  It’s a well established fact that approximately 90% of male patients expressly do not want a "chaperone" regardless of physician gender.  Patients do have the ethical and legal right to choose who and to what degree a provider (physician, PA, NP, nurse, medical assistant, student, or chaperone) participates in his or her healthcare!  They are after all the customer actually paying for a service.

 

Anonymous User
Serious Issue

Anonymous User wrote:

First off, if you think female patients are accorded more modesty and privacy, you've clearly neven been there for a gyn exam, often with attending + resident + chaperone +/- med student, or in the L&D suite near delivery (i've counted 7-8 people for a routine delivery).  Hell you can't even do an EKG or good cardiac exam without moving breasts around.  That's not even getting into gyn procedures and the whole exam under anesthesia debate. For men, it's generally a quick turn your head and cough and a finger up the butt, much faster. I'll take that over a speculum any day. 

While I agree that it's preferable to take patient gender preference into account, that's not practical on a day to day basis. Even if the clinic you're talkiing about had the aforementioned male staff member, what makes you think he would be free at the exact moment you need him? It's already hard enough to schedule an appointment, imagine if you had to scheduel an appointment for a "male physician with male chaperone and female receptionist"all so you don't feel uncomfortable.  Furthermore, as a doctor you are a trained professional regardless of gender, which the patient must acknowledge. If gender is a more important factor to a patient then competence of rapport, then by all means they can visit another urologist. 

[/quote]

While you're certainly entitled to your opinion, I respectfully disagree.  It is highly unlikely a female patient would ever be subjected to a routine OB/GYN exam or procedure in her physician's private practice with such an entourage and certainly not without her prior informed consent.  Moreover, it's even more unlikely the practice employs a single male ancillary staff member (nurse, tech, or chaperone) regardless of the physician's gender.

While I'm unsure how your chaperone comments relate to this discussion, if there actually are urologists performing exams or procedures on male patients with a chaperone attending, patients will likely vote with their feet post haste.  It’s a well established fact that approximately 90% of male patients expressly do not want a "chaperone" regardless of physician gender.  Patients do have the ethical and legal right to choose who and to what degree a provider (physician, PA, NP, nurse, medical assistant, student, or chaperone) participates in his or her healthcare!  They are after all the customer actually paying for a service.

[/quote]

The majority of our patients are referred to us by their PCP and have no objective means to determine competence or rapport prior to their first appointment.  The only reliable information they can access is board certification and gender so it should be no surprise that patients focus on physician gender when making urology appointments considering the nature of care we provide.  We expect them to bare their body and soul to us and repay that trust and faith by expecting them to meekly submit to chaperones or opposite gender ancillary staff in the absence of informed consent.  We would be well served to recognize this is indeed a serious issue for a significant percentage of our patients.

Anonymous User
Few Female Urologists

I had a radical nephroureterectomy for kidney cancer and I have a cystoscopy every six months. My urologist (male) has no concept of modesty. He enters the exam room, rips off the paper sheet and silently performs the procedure while I endure the pain. I would like to hope that a female urologist would be a bit more considerate. My Primary Care Physician is female and I trust her completely. There are however few to no female urologists in northwest Connecticut or Northwest Massachusetts.

Anonymous User
Few Female Urologists

Anonymous User wrote:

I had a radical nephroureterectomy for kidney cancer and I have a cystoscopy every six months. My urologist (male) has no concept of modesty. He enters the exam room, rips off the paper sheet and silently performs the procedure while I endure the pain. I would like to hope that a female urologist would be a bit more considerate. My Primary Care Physician is female and I trust her completely. There are however few to no female urologists in northwest Connecticut or Northwest Massachusetts.

You need to insist your urologist treats you with the dignity and respect all patients are entitled to.  If he refuses, find another urologist!

Anonymous User
no problem

I am a man and my urologist is a woman. She was assigned to me by my HMO but I could have waited and seen a male urologist. I am totally comfortable with this. There are all kinds of procedures that require a man to be exposed to female health care professionals. As you get older they become more frequent. Having an ultrasound on a testicle, for example, or a colonoscopy. 

Anonymous User
No problem

Anonymous User wrote:

I am a man and my urologist is a woman. She was assigned to me by my HMO but I could have waited and seen a male urologist. I am totally comfortable with this. There are all kinds of procedures that require a man to be exposed to female health care professionals. As you get older they become more frequent. Having an ultrasound on a testicle, for example, or a colonoscopy. 

A woman doesn't have to be exposed male health care professionals if she she chooses not to.  Same with the guys with female healthcare professionals.

Anonymous User
treat it like your own.

As a male, urologist , I always introduce the MA.

As long as they're clean, professional, kind, caring, I don't care what you think of their qualifications. I'm NOT doing the cysto/procedure without them.  You don't  need a separate informed consent for their presence. you just need to know who they are, and that I need them there.  They'll likely only hand me things. 

 

--You need to respect even high school grads with a few-week trade certificate. They are the people that make the world go around.  Your life will be full of interactions with them.

--that being said, the people who see you naked in the office should again, be clean, professional, competent, kind and caring.

 

My rule is I treat your urethra/genitals/perineum/modesty as if it were my own.  I tell people that.  they like it.

Anonymous User
treat it like your own

Anonymous User wrote:

As a male, urologist , I always introduce the MA.

As long as they're clean, professional, kind, caring, I don't care what you think of their qualifications. I'm NOT doing the cysto/procedure without them.  You don't  need a separate informed consent for their presence. you just need to know who they are, and that I need them there.  They'll likely only hand me things. 

--You need to respect even high school grads with a few-week trade certificate. They are the people that make the world go around.  Your life will be full of interactions with them.

--that being said, the people who see you naked in the office should again, be clean, professional, competent, kind and caring.

My rule is I treat your urethra/genitals/perineum/modesty as if it were my own.  I tell people that.  they like it.

Forgive me if I'm not impressed with your MA introduction, a basic common courtesy; many urologists don't bother.  When exactly does this occur?  When you first recommend the procedure, or wait until the patient is nude in the exam room and the two of you enter?  I suspect the later because it's much more difficult for a patient to object after consenting privately; it's called an ambush but I suspect you're well aware of that! 

"As long as they're clean, professional, kind, caring, I don't care what you think of their qualifications." 

Clean, really, you think!  This comment is patronizing in the extreme.  Paternalistic medicine is dead; get over it!  It's not about what you think, your claimed MA professional status, or what they've seen before.  It is, however, all about the patient.  Here's an original thought for you, show some empathy for your patients, and hire a couple of male nurses or assistants.  It's clear the vast majority of male patients prefer male urologists.  Their values, beliefs, and preferences don't simply evaporate once their graced with your presence. 

"My rule is I treat your urethra/genitals/perineum/modesty as if it were my own.  I tell people that.  they like it."

It never ceases to amaze me how obtuse providers are.  It's not your urethra, genitals, perineum, or modesty that matters to the patient.

 

Anonymous User
My urologist is a female and

My urologist is a female and I wouldn't trade her for anyone. She is well educated experienced and really great with people. Hands down the best ever! Dr Karen Boyle with Chesapeake urology

Anonymous User
High School Graduate Professional = NOT

"You need to respect even high school grads with a few-week trade certificate. They are the people that make the world go around.  Your life will be full of interactions with them."

How do you equate a patient not wanting opposite gender staff to assist you with lacking respect? Does that mean the countless women daily who elect same gender OB/GYN healthcare don't respect male providers? If so, why is it OK for them but not your male patients who specifically chose a male urologist? Would you expect a female patient to submit to an exam or procedure with male assistant? Obviously not because you don't have any male ancillary staff do you?

 

Car mechanics who attend vocational training are obviously qualified. That doesn't make them professionals and neither are your assistants! To be clear, we're not talking licensed or registered nurses who've clearly earned the right to be called a professional.

Anonymous User
Welcome to a woman's world

As a female, I've only ever had a gyn exam by a female doc once. The other 15 years have been with male docs. I am currently pregnant & 6 of the 7 OB docs are males at my practice. I have no idea who will be on call when I actually deliver. I am in school as a nurse practitioner & am actually contemplating going into urology because of some of the great urologists with whom I work. That's how I came across this post. I'm hoping that this won't be an issue or that there will be enough female patients that would rather see a female that this would not matter.  I can say that my husband has definitely told me that he'd prefer a urologist with smaller fingers than his current doctor.

Anonymous User
Payback?

Anonymous User wrote:

As a female, I've only ever had a gyn exam by a female doc once. The other 15 years have been with male docs. I am currently pregnant & 6 of the 7 OB docs are males at my practice. I have no idea who will be on call when I actually deliver. I am in school as a nurse practitioner & am actually contemplating going into urology because of some of the great urologists with whom I work. That's how I came across this post. I'm hoping that this won't be an issue or that there will be enough female patients that would rather see a female that this would not matter.  I can say that my husband has definitely told me that he'd prefer a urologist with smaller fingers than his current doctor.

As a nurse in NP training, I thought you had an ethical obligation to advocate for your patients.  Maybe I'm reading to close between the lines but it's now payback time, is that correct?  The "on call" argument doesn't hold water either.  We're talking outpatient appointments in an Urologist's private practice, not a procedure requiring hospitalization.  You walked into that practice knowing that your appointments were with male physicians.  You could have easily picked a female OB. Moreover, you didn't have to deal with a single male ancillary staff member did you?  How would you feel if you had specifically chosen a female OB doc who expected you to submit to a gyn exam with a male tech assisting or a male chaperon?  While you may be OK with that, the vast majority of female patients are not and you know it.  Why are the modesty/dignity/privacy concerns of female patients given such deference and male patients are just supposed to suck it up and deal with it?  The bottom-line is male urology patients have the same concerns and are entitled to the same respect. 

Anonymous User
I have had both prefer women urlogist

For the life of me I can't understand a man having a problem being nude for a woman urologist. The male urologist I went to was in such a hurry and just fluffed me off giving me cialis and sent me on my way. He was quick and not gental at all. My female urologist was kind attentive and gentle. I was very comfortable with her. There was nothing to be embarrassed about. She perfomed several tests on me and found the problem. I will stick with her as my urologist because she is fantastic and knows what she is doing.

Anonymous User
Informed Consent

Anonymous User wrote:

As a male, urologist , I always introduce the MA.

As long as they're clean, professional, kind, caring, I don't care what you think of their qualifications. I'm NOT doing the cysto/procedure without them.  You don't  need a separate informed consent for their presence. you just need to know who they are, and that I need them there.  They'll likely only hand me things. 

 

--You need to respect even high school grads with a few-week trade certificate. They are the people that make the world go around.  Your life will be full of interactions with them.

--that being said, the people who see you naked in the office should again, be clean, professional, competent, kind and caring.

 

My rule is I treat your urethra/genitals/perineum/modesty as if it were my own.  I tell people that.  they like it.

"You don't need a separate informed consent for their presence."

You don't define what informed consent is for any particular patient.  You're obligated, ethically, professionally, and most importantly, legally, to provide ALL the information the patient requires to consent to any particular examination or procedure.  

 The American Urological Association Code of Ethics, regarding informed consent, states:

 

"I will consider informed consent integral to providing appropriate medical or surgical care. I recognize that my patient must be provided with ALL of the information necessary to consent and to make his own choice of treatment, regardless of my own advice or judgment. The information provided must include known risks and benefits, costs, reasonable expectations and possible complications, available alternative treatments and their cost, AS WELL AS THE IDENTIFICATION OF OTHER MEDICAL PERSONNEL WHO WILL BE PARTICIPATING DIRECTLY IN THE CARE DELIVERY. Wherever feasible, I will respect my patient's rights and be limited by the scope of my patient's consent." 

The reason why many Urologists fail this basic requirement is they know the majority of their male patients will object to opposite gender staff participating in their care.

Anonymous User
Female Urologist

When I was in the Army on a tour in Korea I was refered to a urologist.  I was a little surprised that the urologist was a female but she was extremely knowledgable and professional.  Based on that experience I would not have any problem seeing a female urologist in the future.

Anonymous User
Female Urologist

      It's not a big deal. I feel much more comfortable with female doctors because they don't have a chip on their shoulders and that in itself makes me feel very comfortable. I have a female skin doctor and I had poison Ivy down below and she insisted on seeing the area. It might sound erotic but when your there in the office it doesn't even cross your mind. The only time I started getting aroused was when I was getting an ultrasound of my kidneys and after 20 minutes the female tech said to me stand up please. So I stood up and she was on her knees with the wand and I started feeling it a little and let her know. It didn't help that she was flirting with me the whole time and I new her life story in just 20 minutes. Maybe it's their maternal instincts that kick in and you naturally feel more comfortable. As far as sexual tension in the air it does not exist unless of course you get that vibe that she thinks your attractive.

Anonymous User
Physician Gender

I have found this post to be really interesting.  I think what everyone is missing, is the actual ability to read what everyone else is saying.  This type of issue transcends gender in todays society.  It seems that we now live in a society where if you feel uncomfortable with something, then there must be something wrong with you rather than the situation.

I recently underwent a foreskin sparing circumcision.  From the time I set my first appointment, until the surgery not 5 days ago, I had to fight and constantly ask for an all male staff to be present the entire time.  This was a confusing and anxiety ridden time for me.  I haven't had many surgical procedures done and have been fortunate enough to live a life that is relatively healthy.  My protest to a female presence was not due to their inteligence or ability to perform the job, it was merely due to modesty and my overall comfort in an already uncomfortable situation.

Though I feel that women are just as competent in their position, I just felt more comfortable with a man present.  I am even more grateful that I fought for this right.  Even on the day of the surgery, I still had a female nurse who told me she was to be in on the surgery; and in a respectful manner I simply informed her about prior arrangements I had made with the hospitals Patient Relations department and their understanding that I requested only male presence.  After she informed me that she just wasn't aware, she very politely thanked me for informing her and retrieved the male PA to assist the Male Urologist for me.

I'm glad I did, because I did not know how involved this procedure was.  When the PA entered the room, he washed my genital area and covered them very thoroughly with that brown liquid (i'm not any kind of doctor obviously).  Now I very easily get erections and I did not want to feel more embarrassed than I already did.  He then told me not to worry.  Then throughout the procedure I learned that the hands on aspect was very intensive.  

Since men already have the same anatomy, it just made sense to me that they could care less about that fact.  I just didn't see the need for a female to touch a man so close in what is considered a "professional" manner.  Now I know they see this everyday, but it still just baffles me a bit.  

If a man is comfortable with a woman, then more power to him.  Same for women, if they feel more comfortable with a male OB then by all means let them see who they want.  I just wish that the awareness and respect was afforded to patients in all aspects of healthcare.

I mean, I personally am not aware of any men that administer Mammograms.  In fact, in this specific hospital, I am not sure they even consider men for those positions.  Obviously they accept their applications, but I don't think it goes beyond there.

I just wish I didn't feel as though the hospital was viewing me as a sexist individual.  I think it's great that women are urologists, and not just because women have to go to Urologists also.  I just know that for me I felt more comfortable around other guys.

 

Anonymous User
A very BIG Issue

Anonymous User wrote:

Anonymous User wrote:

I am a man and my urologist is a woman. She was assigned to me by my HMO but I could have waited and seen a male urologist. I am totally comfortable with this. There are all kinds of procedures that require a man to be exposed to female health care professionals. As you get older they become more frequent. Having an ultrasound on a testicle, for example, or a colonoscopy. 

A woman doesn't have to be exposed male health care professionals if she she chooses not to.  Same with the guys with female healthcare professionals.

Every Hospital in America has a multi-million dollar women's center. Yet rarely will you find a male Ultrasound Technologist. Men are treated as Lesser Patients. It is widely assumed by the Administrators and Physicians who do the staffing that "men don't care ". It is especially ironic (being a Healthcare Professional myself ) to hear Female Radiology Administrators quote this belief. I, of course, quickly ask them " how do you know? have you ever been one? ( a man that is ? ) Most men DO mind very much if a Female is present during any exam of a personal or intimate nature. I have observed however, that men who have served in the Military are less sensative to this. However, this not the case with most men. It is very presumptuous, discriminatory and in fact a danger to Men's Health. How? If there is one thing we can presume about men, is that they often neglect their health. It is difficult enough to get men to visit their Doctor foe necessary checkups and procedures, without subjecting them to the humiliation of exposing themselves to a Female Healthcare worker who is seldom even an RN or LPN. YOU NEED TO ASK FOR CONSENT!!! As well as assure the male patient that a rejection of a Female in the Exam Room, will not evoke a "smirk" or any kind of ridicule.Remember that just because the Physician and the staff "do this "all the time, The patient does not!!! It is irrelivant what the Female Nurse or Ultrasound has seen and how much of it. The male patient is still an individual. You need to assure that he Male patient leaves you Office, your Clinic or your Hospital, with the same dignity they walked in with, if you want to ensure that they follow up with the necessary exams and tests. The gender of the Healthcare provider has a direct bearing on Patient Privacy Rights.

Anonymous User
Female Urologist - Serious Issue????

 

Anonymous User wrote:

I do wonder, however, if outside of residency, male patients will vote with their feet and go only to providers who are male.  My impression is that female urologists in the community see a heavily female patient population... which keeps them busy enough as is.

and 

I think this is a serious issue that medical providers refuse to address because they don't want to hear the answer. Medical care is administered in a claimed gender-neutral environment for expediency and profit and yet society is not gender neutral. To claim otherwise is disingenuous at best.  Moreover, female patients are routinely afforded a much greater degree of modesty, dignity, and privacy than male patients. .....

I find this "serious issue" quite laughable. As a male, I always see female doctors/nurses. I've always found them discreet, professional and knowledgeable - urologist, GP for a full physical, or whatever. Though starting off in my youth with males, once you make the switch - like going from PC to a Mac - you never look back. Almost any woman at random has spent many years of their life making and caring for male bodies. Women always have been and always will be the natural and rightful care takers of both human and animal bodies. As they are the best of care takers, they should comprise the overwhelming majority of all professional care providers, and now that the general suppression of women for so many centuries is off, they will continue to be the higher growing percentage, as they should be. As to your being uncomfortable with some gal or gals seeing your penis - get over it - get a life. 

 

Anonymous User
Nothing Fancy...

I am a 46 year old male.  I have needed to consult with such a doctor on a few occasions.  I also am in need to consult with another due to a person nature (not sexual dysfunction as one comment was made).

I would not ever consult with a female urologist or a male with female nurse who would assist him, unless it was life threatening of course.  You may call it what you will but it is my preference.  

I do wonder why male/female doctors decide to specialize in medicine involving the genitalia of the opposite sex.  I mean really, at such a young age, where does such a decision manifest itself from?

Anonymous User
male vs female urologist

I am a man that will only use female urologists..my body,..my choice

Anonymous User
I am much more comfortable

I am much more comfortable being naked in front of a woman than a man. I cannot understand why any man would choose a man over a woman. I do not like having my privates handled by a man. Not that getting a catheter inserted is has anything to do with sex, I am just more relaxed with women. I guess we are all different, therefore male and female urologists are needed. I am seeing a female urologist today.

 

Anonymous User
Laughable

"I find this "serious issue" quite laughable. As a male, I always see female doctors/nurses. I've always found them discreet, professional and knowledgeable - urologist, GP for a full physical, or whatever. Though starting off in my youth with males, once you make the switch - like going from PC to a Mac - you never look back. Almost any woman at random has spent many years of their life making and caring for male bodies. Women always have been and always will be the natural and rightful care takers of both human and animal bodies. As they are the best of care takers, they should comprise the overwhelming majority of all professional care providers, and now that the general suppression of women for so many centuries is off, they will continue to be the higher growing percentage, as they should be. As to your being uncomfortable with some gal or gals seeing your penis - get over it - get a life."

Sounds like a feminist rant.