When All Is Said and Done

6 posts / 0 new
Last post
M.Arrowsmith
When All Is Said and Done

During all the holiday feasts and parties, did the match come up as a topic of conversation for all of you? If so, I don't know if this is the case for more of you out there, but I found explaining how the match process works to someone entirely unfamiliar with medicine a painfully time-consuming experience, especially when both the person I'm talking to and myself have been drinking a good share of the holiday grog. The conversation generally starts with an inquisitive “So how does this thing work?” Then I know my next 20 minutes will be preoccupied by a sobering back and forth on the details of list preference and so on. For better or worse, Urology is also a field that most people, even those involved in medicine, know surprisingly little about. Well, I guess I shouldn’t' say surprising, because up 'til 3rd year, I knew precious little myself. I tend to get a range of reactions, the more common ones are

  1. people who think you said “Neurology” and proceed to rave about how interesting the nervous system is before you politely guide them back on course, which elicits a confused expression.
  2. Or, people who think that you will be dealing with penis for the rest of your life. The most memorable one along this line was probably a classmate who said: “Oh that's so gay!” Keep in mind, a med student.

The best of the lot are people older than the age of 60. One mention of Urologist and I usually get a knowing nod and a look of.. apprehension? Appreciation? Perhaps a mixture of both. I'm glad urologymatch has a page specifically designed for mothers, which is a big help on the home front.I've made a few tweaks of the match list over break, some of it probably has to do with being around family and talking with the significant other. I've slowly realized that they have more influence over this than I thought, and the list is now a democratic process. There's been some discussion about this recently on the forums, and it's comforting to know that I'm not the only one who thinks that leaving all that you know behind for the possibility of a better robotics training is still a hard decision. I will probably submit the list soon as there are no other foreseeable game-changers. All the hoopla is now over and seems far behind us. The excruciating waiting game begins.

Edited by: nicky on 05/11/2015 - 19:50 Reason: Updated by FeedsNodeProcessor
Anonymous (not verified)
Well said.   

Well said.  

Anonymous (not verified)
Well said indeed!

I get the "neurology" all the time.  Then, I started saying "you-rology" and that seemed to help.  Thank you for sharing your thoughts!

Anonymous (not verified)
Just wait until you are a resident

If you thought the Neurology - Urology confusion was bad to the layman, wait until 3am on home call and you are trying to make someone understand you are the Urologist and know nothing about strokes.  That is when you begin saying You-rology or Urine-ology.Good luck

Anonymous (not verified)
same here.  i started this

same here.  i started this process off with my long checklist of things i wanted in a program, thinking, "I'm going to go wherever it takes to get the best program I can find!".  I traveled all over to interview, but in the end it came back to family, friends, and significant other.  I realized how lonely I'd end up by myself in a strange place, and all for what?  Better robotics?  a VA hospital?  More IVC thrombectomies?  I think overall residency is what you make of it, how motivated you are to learn, see as much as possible, publish, or whatever it is that you want to do.

kbasham
Well said

Perfectly said, in fact...