what to get out of gen surg intern year?

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robosurgeon
what to get out of gen surg intern year?

Hi,I am starting my urology residency in June. In my gen surg intern year, I will have a variety of rotations including peds, ICU, etc. I am wondering what my goals should be for intern year to prepare for urology. Obviously, I will need to pass step 3 but should I also study super hard for the absite (is the material relevant as a future urologist). However, I am unclear if I need to be studying Urology in my spare time or general surgery. Should I be reading Journal of Urology or General surgery journals. Some of the basics obviously overlap. However, any advice between what medical knowledge and OR skills I need to acquire to be successful both as a general surgery intern and prepared for my Uro-2 year would be much appreciated. I'm sure there are vastly different opinions on this but all input is welcome.Thanks!

Edited by: nicky on 05/11/2015 - 19:51 Reason: Updated by FeedsNodeProcessor
Anonymous (not verified)
Good Luck

The General Surgery Year is becoming obsolete and most programs are trending to less general surgery, and they should be doing this.  With the new work hours, most surgical interns get little time in the OR (more time doing scut).  The General Surgery residents are having more problems getting there cases so other interns get pushed aside. If you learn any surgical skills in General Surgery, you are already ahead of the curve.The amount of information you should try to learn are the basics of ICU care, trauma protocols and resuscitation, and peds care.  You will forget almost everything you learn in General Surgery because it does not pertain to Urology, and the rest of it will be obsolete by the time you graduate residency.  This does not require 12 months but 3-6 months would be enough.  I believe the Urology requirement in 6 months. In terms of reading for Urology, don't worry about it unless you are in a Urology rotation.  Most programs don't care about your in-service score during your pre-Urology year.  So read what interests you (if that is poetry, great). Good luck during your intern year

Anonymous (not verified)
completely accurate reply 

completely accurate reply 

geekOCD
I'm going to kind of disagree

I'm going to kind of disagree on some things with the previous poster. I think the most valuable thing I've learned from my gen surg rotations this year was managing common issues on the floor (i.e. chest pain, SOB, fluid resuscitation, post-op bleeding, etc.) and becoming somewhat competent with managing sick patients. I don't think it's important for you to study trauma protocols...at least at my program, we never do trauma. I also don't think it's as important to study ICU-level resuscitation. I think knowing some of that stuff is important for everyone, but realistically most of your patients on urology won't be in the Unit.Maybe my program is different, but on our gen surg rotations all interns (including urology, we're not treated differently) get to the OR a decent amount so I feel like I've definitely worked on some good surgical skills including: getting into an abdomen, placing ports, driving camera & using basic laparoscopic instruments, using surgical staplers (i.e. on bowel), and of course sewing & tying (the most important basic skill for you to work on).Otherwise, I agree that you definitely do NOT need to spend any time studying for the ABSITE. I don't even know my score b/c I haven't bothered to go pick it up.  Nor is it important to read journals or study urology. Obviously if you have the time & desire, then reading medical stuff is a good thing, but it's not necessary or required.

MDforthePP
sounds like you've got a good program

geekOCD wrote:
I'm going to ki......Maybe my program is different, but on our gen surg rotations all interns (including urology, we're not treated differently) get to the OR a decent amount so I feel like I've definitely worked on some good surgical skills including: getting into an abdomen, placing ports, driving camera & using basic laparoscopic instruments, using surgical staplers (i.e. on bowel), and of course sewing & tying (the most important basic skill for you to work on).Otherwise,........
Sounds like you've got a good program.  I don't guess you would share the name?  I imagine these kinds of ideal features attracted you?

geekOCD
Yeah, I thought I'd hate my

Yeah, I thought I'd hate my general surgery time but although we work hard, it really hasn't been that bad & I've learned a lot...I'm still thankful that I don't have to do a lot of it but doing a year or even more wouldn't be the end of the world.  Won't share the name but I guess people consider it top 20? Honestly I didn't know anything about the general surgery program here before I came but I think it's even more established than the uro program (top 10 maybe? I don't know gen surg rankings) so it's pretty well run. The quality of the gen surg program isn't something I thought about at all, and it still probably shouldn't be affecting your applications/rankings but at least in my experience it does make a big difference for your first year.

Anonymous (not verified)
Waste of Time

It will be a year or two of your life you will never get backse

Anonymous (not verified)
I have to agree that GS

I have to agree that GS intern year has largely been a waste of time.  I would encourage all who are making their rank lists to prioritize programs with more urology during their intern year.  There are many disadvantages to going to a program with a full year of GS, as I am currently doing.1.  The learning curve flattens out significantly after 3 months.  We are mainly doing inpatient floor work.  It's the same issues: glucose, blood pressure, cardiac issues, abnormal labs, bleeding, urine outputetc etc.  These are the same calls you would get on a busy urology service with surgical patients.  The advantage here is for the surgery program to have warm bodies doing basic floorwork so GS residents can operate.2. There are many rotations that are not helpful or are minimally helpful for a urologists that you may rotate on several times. (ie multiple icu or trauma months, burns, or 6 months of gallbladder and appy work).3.  The urology services operate with very few or no interns for most of the year at these programs.  This means you will be doing all of the floor work, discharges, etc for another full year (Uro 1 year), which will take away significantly from your OR time, and will diminish the level of responsiblity you are given.That being said, many of these programs are still great.  I could not imagine having to do 2 GS years as some programs have.  That is a tremendous waste of time, all for the benefit of a general surgery department.  I would rank these programs dead last just because it would be better than not matching at all.