Stanford

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Anonymous (not verified)
Attendings

Sorry, but I really think something is up with the attendings. I'm not privy to the details but there has been way more turnover compared to other programs. 

Anonymous User wrote:
 Hey guys,I'm a resident at Stanford and wanted to address some of the comments posted.  With regards to those who experienced poor resident turnout, I realize which interview date y'all were at and want to sincerely apologize - this was due to a combination of administrative error and bad luck (emergency cases….apparently people like to shove things in their urethras, packed ORs mistakenly scheduled when we aim for light days during interviews, etc).    This was an anomaly and we will work to ensure that this type of situation doesn't occur again.I'm not too far removed from where all of y'all are and I know how important first impressions of places are - you are required to make life decisions based on one day at a program and thus word of mouth also plays a huge role (hence Urology Match).  So here goes:Resident morale:  Not sure how this one started but as long as I've been here resident morale has been fine.  We are a busy program and in residency you'll have good days and bad days, but my good days FAR outnumber my bad.  I love my co-residents and on my days off, these are the people I call to have beers, hit the beach, share stories, etc.Length of the program:  We have 1.5 years of General Surgery and 4.5 years of Urology.  We used to be a 2 + 4 but obviously this has changed.  Additionally, we anticipate becoming a 1 + 5 in the coming years (hopefully in the next 1-2 years).  The GS program here is great and overall benign in terms of personalities, hours are strictly enforced, and most importantly you will get to the OR.  Cost of living:  Is high.  As a result, our salaries our higher (close to ~59-60k).  You will be able to find deals in terms of housing if you look in the right places and get a roommate.  If you're looking to buy a house, this will be difficult (thank Facebook).  Operative skills:  This is a rumor that has persisted for years and was actually something I was concerned about when I was interviewing.  I think low operative volume may have been an issue in the past, but with 5 hospitals that we rotate at (Stanford, the VA, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, LPCH, Kaiser) with 12 full-time clinical residents (not counting interns and 4th year research residents) volume is not an issue.  Also, after witnessing the skills of our chief residents that just graduated as well as the ones from this year, I feel confident I'll be able to come out of here doing almost anything.   My medical school Uro program was super-heavy operatively and the residents here come out just as well trained.  Fellowships:  The last two classes of chiefs have all gotten their first choices in terms of fellowships (MSK, MD Anderson, Hopkins, Wash, etc).  Historically, I think there is approximately a 50/50 split in terms of private practice vs fellowship.  The current class of chiefs are all doing fellowships and all are different (onc, reconstruction, MIS).  Faculty:  We have close relationships with our faculty and they are all easily approachable and won't hesitate to take calls or texts whenever you need them.  Dr. Presti was interim chair and left after Dr. Skinner took over the chair position (she is AWESOME btw).  Dr. Gonzalgo is a great guy and we will miss him, but he took a position at Miami for multiple reasons with family being a major issue.  The county attending noted above still is doing part-time at the Valley and working the rest of the time in private practice at PAMF (got a huge raise…I don't blame him).  Dr.  Payne looked pretty content when I saw him yesterday at Grand Rounds.   We have 20+ attendings and are actively hiring more.  Just keep in mind, not with regards to just our program, but any program, in the 5 or 6 years you will be there attendings will come and go (this is simply a fact) and there will be changes always.Why I chose Stanford:  As I said, I was in your shoes not too long ago and this process is exciting and incredibly stressful all at the same time.  The reason I chose this place was multifactorial and included preferences of my significant other, location (I love the Bay Area and the PA weather), the training, and the flexibility of our research year with the additional opportunities to get involved in things outside of simply residency (device design, biomed fellowship programs, innovative research at Stanford, etc).  I also liked being on an undergrad campus again and the energy here is inspiring.  When choosing the place that's best for you, it will be a multi-factorial decision and don't discount things like family, location (no matter where it is, if you want to be close to your folks, etc), personal hobbies because these will play a role in your sanity.  Residency is an extremely busy time especially in surgical fields like Urology. Also, keep in mind personal goals - do you want to do academia? PP?  Not sure yet?   Most top places, hell, most places period should give you good training (minus a few).  I hope this was somewhat helpful.  Good luck to all of you this upcoming match.  

pen island
More info?

Anonymous User wrote:
 Hey guys,I'm a resident at Stanford and wanted to address some of the comments posted. 
Can you give some more info about the program? The website is unfortunately, really vague and poorly constructed: What exactly is the salary from PGY1 - PGY6? If you don't get housing from the lottery, some of the residents were saying that they paid 3K/month for rent.  What is the Call schedule? On interview day, the residnets were pretty vague about it, but it sounded like Q2 call...Thanks!

Anonymous (not verified)
Answers

pen island wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
 Hey guys,I'm a resident at Stanford and wanted to address some of the comments posted. 
Can you give some more info about the program? The website is unfortunately, really vague and poorly constructed: What exactly is the salary from PGY1 - PGY6? If you don't get housing from the lottery, some of the residents were saying that they paid 3K/month for rent.  What is the Call schedule? On interview day, the residnets were pretty vague about it, but it sounded like Q2 call...Thanks!
 1. Website -- it has always been bad and not a priority with the outgoing chair (Dr. Shortliffe) and interim chair (Dr. Presti). Skinner has it on her list of things to do to make it better.2. I don't remember exactly, but roughly, my salary was R1=57K, R2=60K, R3=63K, R4=66K, R5=69K, R6=72K. This includes the extra $3K they give you each year for books, etc.3. If you live in the heart of SF, you'll pay 3K a month. If you have a roommate, a 2 BR is probably 1200-1400 depending on how fancy you are. I never worried about money during residency. There was enough to live, eat, and go out. One thing I wish they did was retirement account matching but you can't have it all.4. Call is mostly front loaded. At Stanford it's Q3. At the county hospital it's Q2 but most stuff can be handled the next morning. At the VA it's Q2 but you never get called and you rarely go in. At Kaiser, it's once a week. After the brutal 3rd year, it's super cush. Is it worth it to get slammed for a year so you can have 3 years of relative calm?I think so, especially when it's later on in your residency and you're trying to focus on academic projects and the next step in your career.5. I've seen residents from other programs operate. On average, we're better. There are some in the program who are ridiculously good surgeons and others who are not that great. Like everything else there's a bell curve. But because we see so much and we get to do so much, by the time you are a chief, if you're not a good surgeon, it's not because of the program. This reputation about being low volume and not technically good comes from over a decade ago when the faculty was half the size.6. Attending turnover -- whenever you have a new chair, there is regime change. Some people leave, new people come. Is it a sign of instability? Sure. That's just what happens when a new lion takes over the pride. He kills all the cubs sired by the old lion. 7. Comprehensive training -- this is something I never appreciated while I was there -- you get exposed to everything. Pediatrics, oncology, lap/robotics, female, infertility, trauma/reconstruction, general urology. It's not just superfluous exposure either. I'm a busy general urologist today and I do all these things. I'd like to think I do them well. I'm at least not afraid to do a case because I didn't get enough practice in residency.You can listen to the rumors or you can accept the fact that really, there is no bad program. If a resident comes out of somewhere and can't operate it's not the program's fault. Either he or she didn't apply themselves or they're clumsy. There is so much doing of stuff and practicing in residency that even if you're not actively participating you pick up stuff. There are times when, ready or not, you have to do a big complex case with an attending. Even as a third year. Ask the current 3rd year residents have many times they've had to do a cystectomy with Skinner because the chief had to do another big juicy case like a post-chemo RPLND in another room. Or how many times they did half a robot prostate because the chief was in the other oncology room doing some big whack with Skinner where they removed half of the abdominal viscera.

Anonymous (not verified)
Lions

"He kills all the cubs sired by the old lion"?!?What kind of BS is that? If I sign on to a residency I want it to be stable. Period! I don't think that's too much to ask for

Anonymous User wrote:
pen island wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
 Hey guys,I'm a resident at Stanford and wanted to address some of the comments posted. 
Can you give some more info about the program? The website is unfortunately, really vague and poorly constructed: What exactly is the salary from PGY1 - PGY6? If you don't get housing from the lottery, some of the residents were saying that they paid 3K/month for rent.  What is the Call schedule? On interview day, the residnets were pretty vague about it, but it sounded like Q2 call...Thanks!
 1. Website -- it has always been bad and not a priority with the outgoing chair (Dr. Shortliffe) and interim chair (Dr. Presti). Skinner has it on her list of things to do to make it better.2. I don't remember exactly, but roughly, my salary was R1=57K, R2=60K, R3=63K, R4=66K, R5=69K, R6=72K. This includes the extra $3K they give you each year for books, etc.3. If you live in the heart of SF, you'll pay 3K a month. If you have a roommate, a 2 BR is probably 1200-1400 depending on how fancy you are. I never worried about money during residency. There was enough to live, eat, and go out. One thing I wish they did was retirement account matching but you can't have it all.4. Call is mostly front loaded. At Stanford it's Q3. At the county hospital it's Q2 but most stuff can be handled the next morning. At the VA it's Q2 but you never get called and you rarely go in. At Kaiser, it's once a week. After the brutal 3rd year, it's super cush. Is it worth it to get slammed for a year so you can have 3 years of relative calm?I think so, especially when it's later on in your residency and you're trying to focus on academic projects and the next step in your career.5. I've seen residents from other programs operate. On average, we're better. There are some in the program who are ridiculously good surgeons and others who are not that great. Like everything else there's a bell curve. But because we see so much and we get to do so much, by the time you are a chief, if you're not a good surgeon, it's not because of the program. This reputation about being low volume and not technically good comes from over a decade ago when the faculty was half the size.6. Attending turnover -- whenever you have a new chair, there is regime change. Some people leave, new people come. Is it a sign of instability? Sure. That's just what happens when a new lion takes over the pride. He kills all the cubs sired by the old lion. 7. Comprehensive training -- this is something I never appreciated while I was there -- you get exposed to everything. Pediatrics, oncology, lap/robotics, female, infertility, trauma/reconstruction, general urology. It's not just superfluous exposure either. I'm a busy general urologist today and I do all these things. I'd like to think I do them well. I'm at least not afraid to do a case because I didn't get enough practice in residency.You can listen to the rumors or you can accept the fact that really, there is no bad program. If a resident comes out of somewhere and can't operate it's not the program's fault. Either he or she didn't apply themselves or they're clumsy. There is so much doing of stuff and practicing in residency that even if you're not actively participating you pick up stuff. There are times when, ready or not, you have to do a big complex case with an attending. Even as a third year. Ask the current 3rd year residents have many times they've had to do a cystectomy with Skinner because the chief had to do another big juicy case like a post-chemo RPLND in another room. Or how many times they did half a robot prostate because the chief was in the other oncology room doing some big whack with Skinner where they removed half of the abdominal viscera.

Anonymous (not verified)
Troll-a-palooza

Troll....troll....troll.....you made your point.  Now, why don't you stick to the CNN comments section? 

Anonymous User wrote:
"He kills all the cubs sired by the old lion"?!?What kind of BS is that? If I sign on to a residency I want it to be stable. Period! I don't think that's too much to ask for
Anonymous User wrote:
pen island wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
 Hey guys,I'm a resident at Stanford and wanted to address some of the comments posted. 
Can you give some more info about the program? The website is unfortunately, really vague and poorly constructed: What exactly is the salary from PGY1 - PGY6? If you don't get housing from the lottery, some of the residents were saying that they paid 3K/month for rent.  What is the Call schedule? On interview day, the residnets were pretty vague about it, but it sounded like Q2 call...Thanks!
 1. Website -- it has always been bad and not a priority with the outgoing chair (Dr. Shortliffe) and interim chair (Dr. Presti). Skinner has it on her list of things to do to make it better.2. I don't remember exactly, but roughly, my salary was R1=57K, R2=60K, R3=63K, R4=66K, R5=69K, R6=72K. This includes the extra $3K they give you each year for books, etc.3. If you live in the heart of SF, you'll pay 3K a month. If you have a roommate, a 2 BR is probably 1200-1400 depending on how fancy you are. I never worried about money during residency. There was enough to live, eat, and go out. One thing I wish they did was retirement account matching but you can't have it all.4. Call is mostly front loaded. At Stanford it's Q3. At the county hospital it's Q2 but most stuff can be handled the next morning. At the VA it's Q2 but you never get called and you rarely go in. At Kaiser, it's once a week. After the brutal 3rd year, it's super cush. Is it worth it to get slammed for a year so you can have 3 years of relative calm?I think so, especially when it's later on in your residency and you're trying to focus on academic projects and the next step in your career.5. I've seen residents from other programs operate. On average, we're better. There are some in the program who are ridiculously good surgeons and others who are not that great. Like everything else there's a bell curve. But because we see so much and we get to do so much, by the time you are a chief, if you're not a good surgeon, it's not because of the program. This reputation about being low volume and not technically good comes from over a decade ago when the faculty was half the size.6. Attending turnover -- whenever you have a new chair, there is regime change. Some people leave, new people come. Is it a sign of instability? Sure. That's just what happens when a new lion takes over the pride. He kills all the cubs sired by the old lion. 7. Comprehensive training -- this is something I never appreciated while I was there -- you get exposed to everything. Pediatrics, oncology, lap/robotics, female, infertility, trauma/reconstruction, general urology. It's not just superfluous exposure either. I'm a busy general urologist today and I do all these things. I'd like to think I do them well. I'm at least not afraid to do a case because I didn't get enough practice in residency.You can listen to the rumors or you can accept the fact that really, there is no bad program. If a resident comes out of somewhere and can't operate it's not the program's fault. Either he or she didn't apply themselves or they're clumsy. There is so much doing of stuff and practicing in residency that even if you're not actively participating you pick up stuff. There are times when, ready or not, you have to do a big complex case with an attending. Even as a third year. Ask the current 3rd year residents have many times they've had to do a cystectomy with Skinner because the chief had to do another big juicy case like a post-chemo RPLND in another room. Or how many times they did half a robot prostate because the chief was in the other oncology room doing some big whack with Skinner where they removed half of the abdominal viscera.

Anonymous (not verified)
Current R3 at Stanford

Current R3 at Stanford. I've done ~500 uro cases, including cystectomy/urethrectomy w Skinner, open partials, lap radicals, reimplants, diversions, and pretty much any water case (including a ureteral tumor ablation using a sweet lil ureteroresectoscope the rep said we were one of the first to use). To the individual who keeps re-posting about attending turnover: If you're so worried about turnover, rank based on that. I don't know how many current/former residents you need to chime in, but I feel 100% comfortable in the direction Skinner is taking the program and trust her completely. The impression she has made on me is outstanding (OR, clinically, as Chair, as person).In the end, that's my advice in general: rank based on what's most important for you. I would choose Stanford again.

Anonymous User wrote:
"He kills all the cubs sired by the old lion"?!?What kind of BS is that? If I sign on to a residency I want it to be stable. Period! I don't think that's too much to ask for
Anonymous User wrote:
pen island wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
 Hey guys,I'm a resident at Stanford and wanted to address some of the comments posted. 
Can you give some more info about the program? The website is unfortunately, really vague and poorly constructed: What exactly is the salary from PGY1 - PGY6? If you don't get housing from the lottery, some of the residents were saying that they paid 3K/month for rent.  What is the Call schedule? On interview day, the residnets were pretty vague about it, but it sounded like Q2 call...Thanks!
 1. Website -- it has always been bad and not a priority with the outgoing chair (Dr. Shortliffe) and interim chair (Dr. Presti). Skinner has it on her list of things to do to make it better.2. I don't remember exactly, but roughly, my salary was R1=57K, R2=60K, R3=63K, R4=66K, R5=69K, R6=72K. This includes the extra $3K they give you each year for books, etc.3. If you live in the heart of SF, you'll pay 3K a month. If you have a roommate, a 2 BR is probably 1200-1400 depending on how fancy you are. I never worried about money during residency. There was enough to live, eat, and go out. One thing I wish they did was retirement account matching but you can't have it all.4. Call is mostly front loaded. At Stanford it's Q3. At the county hospital it's Q2 but most stuff can be handled the next morning. At the VA it's Q2 but you never get called and you rarely go in. At Kaiser, it's once a week. After the brutal 3rd year, it's super cush. Is it worth it to get slammed for a year so you can have 3 years of relative calm?I think so, especially when it's later on in your residency and you're trying to focus on academic projects and the next step in your career.5. I've seen residents from other programs operate. On average, we're better. There are some in the program who are ridiculously good surgeons and others who are not that great. Like everything else there's a bell curve. But because we see so much and we get to do so much, by the time you are a chief, if you're not a good surgeon, it's not because of the program. This reputation about being low volume and not technically good comes from over a decade ago when the faculty was half the size.6. Attending turnover -- whenever you have a new chair, there is regime change. Some people leave, new people come. Is it a sign of instability? Sure. That's just what happens when a new lion takes over the pride. He kills all the cubs sired by the old lion. 7. Comprehensive training -- this is something I never appreciated while I was there -- you get exposed to everything. Pediatrics, oncology, lap/robotics, female, infertility, trauma/reconstruction, general urology. It's not just superfluous exposure either. I'm a busy general urologist today and I do all these things. I'd like to think I do them well. I'm at least not afraid to do a case because I didn't get enough practice in residency.You can listen to the rumors or you can accept the fact that really, there is no bad program. If a resident comes out of somewhere and can't operate it's not the program's fault. Either he or she didn't apply themselves or they're clumsy. There is so much doing of stuff and practicing in residency that even if you're not actively participating you pick up stuff. There are times when, ready or not, you have to do a big complex case with an attending. Even as a third year. Ask the current 3rd year residents have many times they've had to do a cystectomy with Skinner because the chief had to do another big juicy case like a post-chemo RPLND in another room. Or how many times they did half a robot prostate because the chief was in the other oncology room doing some big whack with Skinner where they removed half of the abdominal viscera.

Anonymous (not verified)
Change is inevitable

Residency is 6 years. Lots of things can change. A program that looks like it'll never change when you match can be totally different by the time you graduate.Look at USC -- the only place where people still routinely did sternum-to-pubis incisions for a cystectomy when I was an intern that changed into a place where they do robotic cystectomy/intracorporal diversions routinely. All in the span of a regime change.Look at UCSD -- they went from a not that well regarded program to an up and coming program with a new respected chair who recruited some good people.Look at Yale -- they went from being way overrated because of the Yale name to being a pretty good program now that they have great chairman.If you rank based on "program stability" you're making an assumption that things won't change over a 5-6 year period. That's just stupid. Attendings move around all the time in academics. It's often easier to get a promotion or a raise by changing jobs, i.e., going to a place where your specific skillset is in greater demand or more appreciated.

Anonymous User wrote:
Current R3 at Stanford. I've done ~500 uro cases, including cystectomy/urethrectomy w Skinner, open partials, lap radicals, reimplants, diversions, and pretty much any water case (including a ureteral tumor ablation using a sweet lil ureteroresectoscope the rep said we were one of the first to use). To the individual who keeps re-posting about attending turnover: If you're so worried about turnover, rank based on that. I don't know how many current/former residents you need to chime in, but I feel 100% comfortable in the direction Skinner is taking the program and trust her completely. The impression she has made on me is outstanding (OR, clinically, as Chair, as person).In the end, that's my advice in general: rank based on what's most important for you. I would choose Stanford again.
Anonymous User wrote:
"He kills all the cubs sired by the old lion"?!?What kind of BS is that? If I sign on to a residency I want it to be stable. Period! I don't think that's too much to ask for
Anonymous User wrote:
pen island wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
 Hey guys,I'm a resident at Stanford and wanted to address some of the comments posted. 
Can you give some more info about the program? The website is unfortunately, really vague and poorly constructed: What exactly is the salary from PGY1 - PGY6? If you don't get housing from the lottery, some of the residents were saying that they paid 3K/month for rent.  What is the Call schedule? On interview day, the residnets were pretty vague about it, but it sounded like Q2 call...Thanks!
 1. Website -- it has always been bad and not a priority with the outgoing chair (Dr. Shortliffe) and interim chair (Dr. Presti). Skinner has it on her list of things to do to make it better.2. I don't remember exactly, but roughly, my salary was R1=57K, R2=60K, R3=63K, R4=66K, R5=69K, R6=72K. This includes the extra $3K they give you each year for books, etc.3. If you live in the heart of SF, you'll pay 3K a month. If you have a roommate, a 2 BR is probably 1200-1400 depending on how fancy you are. I never worried about money during residency. There was enough to live, eat, and go out. One thing I wish they did was retirement account matching but you can't have it all.4. Call is mostly front loaded. At Stanford it's Q3. At the county hospital it's Q2 but most stuff can be handled the next morning. At the VA it's Q2 but you never get called and you rarely go in. At Kaiser, it's once a week. After the brutal 3rd year, it's super cush. Is it worth it to get slammed for a year so you can have 3 years of relative calm?I think so, especially when it's later on in your residency and you're trying to focus on academic projects and the next step in your career.5. I've seen residents from other programs operate. On average, we're better. There are some in the program who are ridiculously good surgeons and others who are not that great. Like everything else there's a bell curve. But because we see so much and we get to do so much, by the time you are a chief, if you're not a good surgeon, it's not because of the program. This reputation about being low volume and not technically good comes from over a decade ago when the faculty was half the size.6. Attending turnover -- whenever you have a new chair, there is regime change. Some people leave, new people come. Is it a sign of instability? Sure. That's just what happens when a new lion takes over the pride. He kills all the cubs sired by the old lion. 7. Comprehensive training -- this is something I never appreciated while I was there -- you get exposed to everything. Pediatrics, oncology, lap/robotics, female, infertility, trauma/reconstruction, general urology. It's not just superfluous exposure either. I'm a busy general urologist today and I do all these things. I'd like to think I do them well. I'm at least not afraid to do a case because I didn't get enough practice in residency.You can listen to the rumors or you can accept the fact that really, there is no bad program. If a resident comes out of somewhere and can't operate it's not the program's fault. Either he or she didn't apply themselves or they're clumsy. There is so much doing of stuff and practicing in residency that even if you're not actively participating you pick up stuff. There are times when, ready or not, you have to do a big complex case with an attending. Even as a third year. Ask the current 3rd year residents have many times they've had to do a cystectomy with Skinner because the chief had to do another big juicy case like a post-chemo RPLND in another room. Or how many times they did half a robot prostate because the chief was in the other oncology room doing some big whack with Skinner where they removed half of the abdominal viscera.

Anonymous (not verified)
Haters

Actually, all the haters can just please leave Stanford off their rank list. You won't thrive in sunny California with a sour disposition. You won't really get along with the great group of residents there now.

Anonymous (not verified)
all hostilities aside

hi all,all nastiness aside, i do think there is something to be said about trying to judge programs by recent history vs speculated future changes....whether it is attendings leaving/coming, case distribution, etchappy holidays y'all

ralprobot
Diabolical plot FOILED

 it was probably just one "hater" who wanted to publicly bash Stanford in hopes of dissuading people from ranking it high....thus increasing this "hater's" chances of matching there.  Smart move....smart move....too bad your plot was foiled before rank list submission deadline.  Bwhahahahahaha. bwahahahahahahhahahaha 

Anonymous User wrote:
Actually, all the haters can just please leave Stanford off their rank list. You won't thrive in sunny California with a sour disposition. You won't really get along with the great group of residents there now.