Best quality of life?

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Anonymous (not verified)
You should not care about

You should not care about quality of life as a resident. If you want good training you have to work hard. Importance is qaulity of life as an attending.

Anonymous (not verified)
quality of life

Anonymous User wrote:
You should not care about quality of life as a resident. If you want good training you have to work hard. Importance is qaulity of life as an attending.
 Come on now- 5 or 6 years is a long time.  Whether quality of life is good or not-so-good, we all work really hard as urology residents.  I don't think you need to feel utterly exhausted and sacrifice all semblance of a normal life to get good training.  No need to take that hardline attitude; it's a reasonable question

pantala
QoL

... of course you should care about quality of life.

Anonymous (not verified)
QOL

I'm going to throw in my two cents to add a little perspective at the end of residency (PGY4 at a busy program).  QOL is important, but it isnot measured in number of call nights or hours worked.  Sure, those things play into it, but in reality every program will garner days where you leave the hospital saying how bad the program is.  What really matters for your QOL are 2 things:1.  I am getting the right training and enough volume to feel prepared (nothing saps you QOL like the fear of failure due to under-preparedness)2.  Do I like the people I am training with (I spend way more time with my co-residents than my wife and kids, and I would be miserable if I didn't like/care about the guys I am with). just my 2 cents.  Good luck.

Anonymous (not verified)
Mayo clinic rochester, mn.

Mayo clinic rochester, mn.  We have tremendous volume, work great hours and are on call q12 days on average.   It is home call which I think is great.  Sometimes  you end up not having to come in at all and can field most phone calls from home, sometimes it's busy and you stay up all night (operating).  not "driving around with foleys" in the trunk as someone mentioned.  We have a cath team that does everything catheter related, we get called only when they fail and 9/10 that means bedside cysto.  The residents are all super happy and we truly don't violate hours.  There is no busy work.   From day one, you are a doctor and a surgeon and the time you spend learning is always high yield and usually involves complex cases that the "outside hospital" referred over.  This was my number 1 choice 3 years ago and it still would be today.  I'm happy, my wife is happy, the other residents are too and we have plenty of time to live a semi normal life.   I truly believe this is the best program in the country.  I was a very strong applicant and interviewed all over the country and it was very simple to make my rank list.   There was mayo clinic and there was everywhere else.

Anonymous (not verified)
Think Location Too

One major caveat I feel to Mayo Clinic's renowned awesomeness is unfortunately, the location. While training and institutional culture should be at the top of your mind when looking at what programs you want to be at for 5-6 years, the city that you (and for some your SO) will be living in play a huge part in QOL also. I feel like sometimes there's this unnecessary taboo about picking a place with location being taken into account. Do not underestimate the effect that weather, proximity to friends/family, things to do, places to eat, job prospects for SO etc. will have.   This will be different for everyone, but I just wanted to highlight that fact.