Away rotations

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uronut
Away rotations

I was wondering if people who recently matched could help shed some light on different away sub-Is you did and how you felt about your experience at those institutions (i.e. # rotators, able to get LOR?, hours, etc..)? Those of us applying for uro next year are currently in the midst of deciding where to do aways, and it is hard to find any information about most away rotations. Thanks in advance for your help!

Edited by: nicky on 05/11/2015 - 19:51 Reason: Updated by FeedsNodeProcessor
Anonymous (not verified)
In the same boat

Info on away rotations is suprisingly sparce. I'm particularly interested in the number of rotators on any particularly away. If any fellow users can recommend a resource that would be appreciated.

Anonymous (not verified)
Lahey away

HiI was one of the students that rotated at Lahey last summer. It was an AMAZING experience in my opinion. I rotated with 4 other medical students, but didnt feel like it was problem. I think that we all got a good amount of "face time" with the chair and attendings. This was one of their slower months, but still pretty busy. Typically got in to pre round at 530AM (official rounds started anywhere from 6-630AM depending on the service) and left around 530-6PM on avergage. There were def days where we stayed to close to 7PM and also days where they let us leave around like 430PM. Based on other people who rotated there during other months (no attendings on vaca etc), they typically got out around 630PM consistently. There were no weekend or call shifts, but they had no problems with you coming in if something interesting came to the ED. Keep in mind, the ED didnt seem like it was super busy.Chair: Dr. Libertino was absolutely fantastic! He is a master teacher in teh OR and in clinics and his residents and other faculty members are super lucky to be under his leadership. He was very much welcoming and seemed to be genuinely invested in the medical students that rotated there. He really wanted tgo get to know people and I would say about 90% of our discussions were about non uro things. He just a super cool stand up kind of guy. Attendings:All that I worked with were pretty cool. They have all areas of uro covered (minimally invasive, onc, reconstructive, female, stones, ED) for the most part except peds, for which they rotate at boston childrens. They had one female attending who does mostly stones, HOLEP etc. She seemed very happy. They integrated us pretty well and really had no issues with us being hands on. Again, I felt like they wanted to get to know us beyond urology and had lots of pretty cool convos. There were def some attendings that were more engaging than others, but for the most part they were pretty cool. They seemed to be always open for questions and were very helpful. I really think Dr. Libertino sets a good tone for the dept.Residents: Def hard working, well trained, cohesive, and HAPPY. They did a good job incorporating us into their niche and were probably some of the coolest residents I met. Went out of their way to make sure we got enough time with faculty. There were at least four women who seemed to be very happy with the program. Letters: We had an interview with the program director about 2-3 weeks in and Dr. Libertino during the last week. Long story short, letters were ready and submitted to ERAS before the rotation ended! Dr. Libertino even stated that he wanted to make sure they were done for us on time.Overall: A solid program, especially if you want to be in the north east for residency. Although Lahey is about 30 mins outside of Boston and you wont get the urban trauma setting if thats your thing, its still a great place to rotate!  I hope this was helpful. Good luck with your rotations and the match next year!

Anonymous (not verified)
Anyone else?

Anyone else? It's tough to pick aways and any input on past experiences would be helpful. 

pantala
Away mayo AZ

Mayo AZ was a great away. Unfortunately it's a separate application from VSAS and requires a letter of recommendation, personal statement, and CV- just to do the away. On the plus side, they let you do whatever dates you want which makes scheduling other aways and your home rotation much easier. Another nice thing is that when you're accepted they send a list of people who have volunteered their homes to visiting students (for a price- but still much better than searching craigslist).For three weeks there was one other student and for the last week I was the only student on. I usually got there at 5 to help with the list and pre rounding and left between 430-630, one day was 830. Rotation was very laid back; some pimping but was very benign. Residents were helpful and a lot of fun. I spent only a few days in clinic and the rest was OR. Amazing facilities, small numbers of impressive faculty. Got a letter from the chairman that was very timely. 

Anonymous (not verified)
Penn Away

Did an away at Penn previously and just wanted to talk a little about it, something I wished I knew beforehand. The away at Penn isn't like a typical away rotation. Usually theres 6 students at one time but its spread out between hospitals so its not bad. Its kind of designed as an observership primarily and your responsibilities are limited to the OR. Each week, you rotate a different hospital including Main Hospital, CHOP, Penn Presby, Pennsylvania Hospital all within 2 miles of each other in Philadelpia. I thought this had its positives and negatives. It allowed a great look at the different sites and meeting all the attendings and residents at a larger program. Downside is of course you're only there a week so its tough to get acclimated and truly shine until youre shipped off. Additionally its really tough to work hard and shine given that you don't have computer access and you don't even get an ID to get into the building. You have no responsibilities on the wards, they round without you. You go to conferences and you go to the OR, then you go home. Hours typically were 6:30-7 to 4-6, other than occassional nights that were busy than others at CHOP and HUP. It seems most of your performance depends on a 10 min student presentation that you are asked to give on any topic related to Urology. You may or may not have the opportunity to work with Dr. Wein who has very limited clinical time. You do have an opportunity to meet with him and discuss your application which I found very helpful. Extremely well known in the field and a great person. Overall, if I had to do it again I would have chosen an away at another place given my experience. Also, I was foruntate to get an interview, but not everyone that does an away gets an interview and I would say its about 50%. They have a peculiar selection criteria that no one can seem to figure out.  

Anonymous (not verified)
Agree with Penn Away Comments

The above poster has it spot on.  There is really no way to shine (but there are very few aways that truly do let you shine, especially if you go to one where there are multiple rotators per month), but they really try to maximize the exposure you get to the hospital system, the attendings, and the residents.  It truly is about whether or not you'll "fit" in there.  Every resident and attending gets a (very blunt, I might add) sheet that specifically asks them to rate you on your fit to the Penn system, and a simple yes/no on whether or not they want you to match there.  Afterwards, Dr. Wein compiles them all and in addition to his mini-interview with you, makes his assessment of you.  No doubt about it, he writes a great letter and I had multiple interviewers comment on his letter.  Not sure if this is true, but I heard that because Penn gets so many requests for away students, that they screen and if you're offered an away here, you've already passed the numbers game and you're on Dr. Wein's radar and the sub-I is a way to see if you are compatible with them.  Regardless, I wouldn't call my time at Penn a waste and I was glad for the experience there, if only to see what I thought of the program (as well as the letter).

Anonymous (not verified)
University of Michigan Away

# of Rotators when I rotated: 3 totalOther months: I think ranged from 3 – 5 rotators in a month, but the clinical volume makes it so that there’s usually no overlapExperience: You have a choice of services you would like to be a part of including:1. Laparoscopy/Endoscopy2. Oncology3. Neurourology/Pelvic Reconstruction4. VA5. Male/General (Including Infertility)6. Pediatrics (Mandatory)All students spend one week in pediatrics, where you can work with Dr. Bloom (chairman). You will schedule two weeks on a second service of your choice and one week on another service of your choice. The flexibility of the schedule provides exposure to multiple attendings, ORs, clinics, conferences and a chance to meet with different residents.  Also, if you feel that you want to participate on an additional service, they try to be flexible to broaden your experience.Schedule: You get weekends off which I think serves a dual purpose.  A chance to relax and explore the town to see if it’s the type of place you want to live.  At the same time, it gives you some time to work on your Grand Rounds presentation (expect a few questions about your grand rounds!).  There's so many things to enjoy in Ann Arbor during the summer and they'll surely ask you "have you tried Zimmerman's yet?"Attendings: Although the staff is one of the largest in the country, they make it a point to welcome you to the institution and try to get to know you on an individual basis.  I appreciated this because it can be somewhat intimidating to be a new setting and they made you feel welcome.Residents: Very funny and hard working group of residents.  The resident’s take time to teach you in and out of the ORs and make sure that you get in as many cases as possibleOne of the highlights of the rotation is to join the Urology breakfast that happens every morning when there isn’t conference.  They get together and have breakfast before the day starts so you really get to meet the crew.  (There's always food!). Chairman: Everyone who rotates has a scheduled meeting with the Chairman towards the end of the rotation. You also have a designated meeting time with the program director.  These are great opportunities to ask for letters of recommendation!Advice on away rotations: When I was looking into doing away rotations, I wanted to expand on my "geographical" territory given that I did both undergrad and medical school at the same location so I applied in different regions.  I also asked the residents at my home institution for advice on where they did their away rotations and what they liked/didn't like about those places.  I think they were my best resource, but hopefully this forum will also help!

Anonymous (not verified)
UTSW?

Historically on the board known as a great place, any updated thoughts/ experiences?

Anonymous (not verified)
UTSW

Anonymous User wrote:
Historically on the board known as a great place, any updated thoughts/ experiences?
 An away doesn't guarentee an interview @ UTSW, I know multiple folks who "wasted a month there".   Be realistic if you need to be.  A mid range board score, mid range class rank, and no research + away = no interview.  

Anonymous (not verified)
OHSU, MUSC, Utah

 Any thoughts on OHSU, MUSC, or Utah would definitely be appreciated!